Sonntag, Juni 25, 2017

ARB_gl_spirv, NIR linking, and a NIR backend for radeonsi

SPIR-V is the binary shader code representation used by Vulkan, and GL_ARB_gl_spirv is a recent extension that allows it to be used for OpenGL as well. Over the last weeks, I've been exploring how to add support for it in radeonsi.

As a bit of background, here's an overview of the various relevant shader representations that Mesa knows about. There are some others for really old legacy OpenGL features, but we don't care about those. On the left, you see the SPIR-V to LLVM IR path used by radv for Vulkan. On the right is the path from GLSL to LLVM IR, plus a mention of the conversion from GLSL IR to NIR that some other drivers are using (i965, freedreno, and vc4).

For GL_ARB_gl_spirv, we ultimately need to translate SPIR-V to LLVM IR. A path for this exists, but it's in the context of radv, not radeonsi. Still, the idea is to reuse this path.

Most of the differences between radv and radeonsi are in the ABI used by the shaders: the conventions by which the shaders on the GPU know where to load constants and image descriptors from, for example. The existing NIR-to-LLVM code needs to be adjusted to be compatible with radeonsi's ABI. I have mostly completed this work for simple VS-PS shader pipelines, which has the interesting side effect of allowing the GLSL-to-NIR conversion in radeonsi as well. We don't plan to use it soon, but it's nice to be able to compare.

Then there's adding SPIR-V support to the driver-independent mesa/main code.  This is non-trivial, because while GL_ARB_gl_spirv has been designed to remove a lot of the cruft of the old GLSL paths, we still need more supporting code than a Vulkan driver. This still needs to be explored a bit; the main issue is that GL_ARB_gl_spirv allows using default-block uniforms, so the whole machinery around glUniform*() calls has to work, which requires setting up all the same internal data structures that are setup for GLSL programs. Oh, and it looks like assigning locations is required, too.

My current plan is to achieve all this by re-using the GLSL linker, giving a final picture that looks like this:

So the canonical path in radeonsi for GLSL remains GLSL -> AST -> IR -> TGSI -> LLVM (with an optional deviation along the IR -> NIR -> LLVM path for testing), while the path for GL_ARB_gl_spirv is SPIR-V -> NIR -> LLVM, with NIR-based linking in between. In radv, the path remains as it is today.

Now, you may rightfully say that the GLSL linker is a huge chunk of subtle code, and quite thoroughly invested in GLSL IR. How could it possibly be used with NIR?

The answer is that huge parts of the linker don't really that much about the code in the shaders that are being linked. They only really care about the variables: uniforms and shader inputs and outputs. True, there are a bunch of linking steps that touch code, but most of them aren't actually needed for SPIR-V. Most notably, GL_ARB_gl_spirv doesn't require intrastage linking, and it explicitly disallows the use of features that only exist in compatibility profiles.

So most of the linker functionality can be preserved simply by converting the relevant variables (shader inputs/outputs, uniforms) from NIR to IR, then performing the linking on those, and finally extracting the linker results and writing them back into NIR. This isn't too much work. Luckily, NIR reuses the GLSL IR type system.

There are still parts that might need to look at the actual shader code, but my hope is that they are few enough that they don't matter.

And by the way, some people might want to move the IR -> NIR translation to before linking, so this work would set a foundation for that as well.

Anyway, I got a ridiculously simple toy VS-PS pipeline working correctly this weekend. The real challenge now is to find actual test cases...

Kommentare:

flibitijibibo hat gesagt…

If it's of any interest, I've been looking into adding a SPIR-V emitter for MojoShader:

https://github.com/flibitijibibo/MojoShader/compare/spirv?expand=1

It's super incomplete, but the stubs are at least there and the ARB_gl_spirv calls are in place - if someone filled in the functions used by the shaders they were testing it'd probably make for a reasonable real-world test case. This branch on GitHub is the one I use for FNA and all of its games:

https://github.com/FNA-XNA/fna-xna.github.io/blob/master/js/main.js#L11

All you'd have to do is drop in your own libmojoshader.so and it'll automatically try out the ARB_gl_spirv backend, when the driver lets us. There are other games using this too which you could probably LD_PRELOAD for testing, like Super Meat Boy and Killing Floor 1. I have some keys for a few of my games if you'd be willing to try this out (though it'd require filling in the MojoShader stuff, which isn't as nice as having the data ready right away), if this sounds interesting at all poke me and I'll send them your way.

Nicolai Hähnle hat gesagt…

Yes, this kind of thing is what I was hoping for! It sounds like I'd definitely want to do some tests along those lines in the next few weeks.